Easy to understand Online safety social story

Easy to understand Online safety social story

Keeping your children safe online, is something all parents have to think about these days. We were given a easy to understand online safety social story by Jack’s School. I believe in giving Jack as much freedom as we possibly can. About a year ago we ran into some problems online, with Jack using TikTok.

If you are not aware of TikTok, it is a social video sharing app. Jack discovered it and became obsessed with making videos. He does all sorts of stuff with the videos, adding music, filters and stuff beyond what I know how to do. I personally think it is a great creative outlet for him, and encourage him to work on his videos. Here is an an example of the type of things he does.


Message problems


The problems came with it being a social media app, meaning you could message people. Something Jack wanted to do. You can turn messages off, which is what we did, but it didn’t take Jack long to figure out how to turn them back on.

The problem with Jack messaging people is his lack of understanding of how the real world works. If someone tells Jack they are his friend, he will believe that without question. That obviously has massive safety implications. Jack also can’t separate reality from fantasy. He would think something he watched in a movie was real life.

We have made some slow progress trying to explain these things to him. He has acknowledged these things when talking to him, but it’s difficult to know if he’s saying things just to shut Mum and Dad up. Jack has learned how to say things, to be able to get what he wants. We had problems explaining this to school at first, but they’ve seen it now. Jack is very clever at getting what he wants.

a different type of video

Jack’s trouble with social interaction

The other problem that Jack has in all walks of life. Is people see this 6 foot tall, well built person and think he is a lot older than he is. Add the fact his understanding levels are less than his age. This leaves a massive gap between what people expect of him and what he can actually do. Although his autistic traits are becoming more profound with age. It is not always obvious to people that Jack is “different”, until he speaks. With new people or someone you bump into out and about. Jack’s anxiety means he can get flustered and mix up his words.

When he talks to people, the conversation can be very one way, unless you know him well. Then you might be able to get a two-way conversation out of him, but only if Jack is willing. So when we found he had been messaging people, what we found was Jack bombarding people with talk about a subject. Often annoying the other person, as he wouldn’t stop.

Easy to understand online safety social story

We talked with school about the issue, and they worked on it at school and provided us with a social story. We now make our own using Twinkl, which is a website I highly recommend. I wanted Jack to still be able to make his videos. It is a great creative outlet for him, and something he really enjoys. But we had to make sure it was in a safe environment, so we went through the social story with him.

Online safety social
Story part 1
Online social story part 2

We took the step of deleting TikTok from Jacks phone, and made it so he couldn’t sign back into it. Unsurprisingly Jack wasn’t happy about this, but we came up with a solution that Jack has accepted. I have the TikTok app on my phone, and he is allowed to use it as long as we see what he’s made before he posts it. To be honest I enjoy watching the videos anyway. Also the messages have to stay turned off.

He asks to have it back on his own phone every now and then, but that’s not happening yet. It does mean I have to give up my phone when he wants to make videos, but I can live with that.

Conclusion

I know what you let your children do online and with technology is a divisive subject. It is an area where Jack thrives and even excels, in a world where he struggles with so many things. For that reason I encourage him in the area as much as possible, but of course always wanting to keep him as safe as possible. That was one of the reasons why this blog was started, to give him a platform where we can do stuff together. Something he is really excited about, and why we have the Jack’s documents section on the website. It’s important to have fun and be creative, but you always have to stay safe at the same time.

Dad Does Autism

Anyone else starting to crack up?

Anyone else starting to crack up?

So it’s basically been 2 weeks of everyone being at home, and not being able to go out. So the question I want to ask is, anyone else starting to crack up? Or is it just me? I’ve got a lot of things I can be getting on with to pass the time, but for the last couple of days I’ve struggled for motivation.

What really hit home yesterday, was I saw it in Lily for the first time. She didn’t want to go outside, she didn’t want to do much of anything. She just sort of moped about, looking fed up. I was in a funny moody, Natalie and the kids would tell you I was being annoying. Basically I was making silly noises, and doing stupid things. It’s something I do quite a lot, I get a sort if release from it. Yesterday was over the top and I got on everyone’s nerves.

In the end we went for a little drive around locally. I’m not sure where you stand with just having a bit of a drive. We didn’t get out anywhere, we just had a bit of a drive. Is that ok? I’m not really sure, but I needed to see some different scenery for my sanity. Everyone else felt the same, and I personally felt much better when we got back. I think everyone did. Jack has started to get more and more agitated, by not being able to follow his normal routines. He’s become very argumentative, but we are just about keeping a lid on it. I just wish I had some answers for him, the uncertainty is the worst part for everybody. For Jack it is even more of a problem.

So is anyone else starting to crack up? Or are you doing ok so far? If you are starting to feel it, what are you doing to try and cope with it? Any ideas are welcome, please leave a comment below.

Dad Does Autism

The first week at home with the kids

The first week at home with the kids

So how is everyone feeling after the first week at home with the kids? I know some might have had them home earlier, and some homeschool all the time. But I think for most of us, at least in England where I live, this was week 1. So how’s it been?

Still having problems with Lily’s ear

It’s gone fairly well for us. The only real problem we’ve had is Lily is still complaining of pain in her ear. She seems fine the majority of the day, but come night time it’s a different story. She has woken up crying every night this week. Jack has coped with it really well, a few times he seems to have slept hrough it. 

One time I went to check on Jack he was awake playing on his Nintendo Switch. It was around 4am. I asked him if Lily woke him up, he nodded yes. I asked him if he was alright, he nodded yes again. He was clearly tense, but he was managing to hold it together, which is really good.

Last night didn’t go so well. Lily woke up crying again, and this time I could hear straight away, Jack throwing things around his room. I went to check him and he had a real look of distress on his face and tears in his eyes. I tried to reassure him, but he just threw things at me, I told him Lily was ok, and left him for a few minutes. When I checked he had calmed down enough to be sat on his bed. It was just one disturbed nights sleep to far.

It’s a frustrating time, due to the situation getting a doctors appointment is near impossible, so you speak to one on the phone and they are guessing what’s wrong. She’s on her second antibiotic now. Fingers crossed this one works. The situation is difficult enough, without that added stress.

Things have generally been good

The day times have generally been good, during the first week at home with the kids. Jack and Lily both seem to be enjoying being at home. They’ve had some fun doing different activities. Jack has been a bit argumentative, which was to be expected, but has been calmer than he was during the recent school holidays. We’ve not pushed him with doing school work. He’s never had any homework, so he’s not understanding why he suddenly has to do work at home. So I’ve got a few ideas for him to learn using things he’s interested in.

Lily didn’t do any work the first few days, I thought it right to give her some time to adjust to what was going on. Then she started doing the work by herself. I’ve seen people trying to be teachers, and it’s almost like a competition with some people on social media. I don’t understand that way of thinking myself. I’m more interested in my children’s well being, than I am making sure they get all the work sheets done.

We are lucky to have a decent bit of garden space, so the kids can get out there for a bit of fresh air and some exercise. They’ve been out everyday, with the exception that Jack didn’t want to go outside yesterday. 

I’m doing ok

I’m holding up alright. I am concerned about the effect of a prolonged lockdown on my depression, but I’m doing fine. I’ve actually enjoyed having the kids home for the most part. Ask me if I still am in 3 or 4 weeks, then maybe my answer will be different, but so far I’m feeling good. I’ve been spending a lot of time at home anyway over the past year, so one week without going out doesn’t bother me. If it becomes 4, 5, 6 weeks, then it will be a different story.

The first week at home with the kids then, up to now it’s been pretty good, everyone’s fit and well, and as long as that’s the case I don’t want to complain about anything else. I hope it’s going as well for everyone else. Families living with autism have extra pressures, and this a really difficult time. But it is difficult for all families. So I say to everybody, stay safe and stay well.

Coronavirus Social Story

Coronavirus Social Story

I wanted to share a coronavirus social story, that was kindly sent to me by someone on twitter. Obviously it is a very worrying time for everybody at the moment. These are unprecedented times in all our lives, and after the announcement from Boris Johnson last night. That we are basically in lockdown, it is getting more and more “real”.

The challenging behaviour from Jack over the weekend rose dramatically, from where it has been recently. It wasn’t a surprise, and I knew it was down to what is happening. Lily is also showing signs that she is struggling. First thing Monday morning she was sick in the bathroom, the first day of no school. This is an ongoing issue with vomiting, that we are not sure if it’s anxiety or allergy related, which I’ve talked about before.

Something amazing

Jack did something amazing yesterday, after sitting down and talking to him. He told us he was scared and confused by the coronavirus. This is such a massive thing. A lot of the problems Jack has, come from not being able to communicate effectively, or express his emotions. So for him to do that was incredible. 18 months ago I would have thought it was impossible. It’s yet more evidence of how far he has come.

He also asked for a Coronavirus social story, to help him understand what is going on. We told him we would get one for him. Last night a very kind person emailed me one. It is very good and Jack is very happy witH it. It’s so important to find a way to explain what’s happening.

Jack had already calmed down and appears less anxious. Of course it will take continuous reassurance, and revisiting this social story. But we will do whatever it takes to make Jack and Lily feel safe.

I thought it only right to share the coronavirus social story in the blog, for as many people to see as possible.

There it is, I hope people find it useful. The autism and SEN community on twitter can be a wonderful and helpful place, as was proved again here. If you want to make your own social story for this or any other subject, I highly recommend Twinkl as a great resource. I hope everyone is coping well in these difficult time, stay strong everyone. Please feel free to share any resources or ideas to help people get through this difficult time. Thank you.

Happy Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day! These are difficult times, I’m worried about Jack, but I’m not doing much better. I don’t think Natalie is either, while Lily seems to be doing better she is already talking of missing her friends. But it’s still only right to wish a Happy Mother’s Day to all the mums out there.

It was home made cards from Jack and Lily to their mum this year. Jack made his at school, while Lily made hers at home.

Jack’s on the left, Lily’s on the right

It’s certainly a memorable Mother’s Day, though not really for the right reasons. Unfortunately I spent a lot of the day sorting out a blocked sink. I might go into that more in another post. So basically it was just chilling out at home. What has everyone else been up to? How have you made the most of Mother’s Day? Feel free to leave a comment below.

Inside Jack’s card

Mum was treated to some flowers and a super big box of malteasers, which are her favourite and a good sharing chocolate.

Inside of Lily’s card

As you can see Lily likes to use every bit of space, which includes the back. You can see more of her art work in the Lily’s Art Gallery section. Jack has done some brilliant drawings at school as well, which I will look to put up on here soon. He seems to be able to copy something brilliantly, rather than Lily’s just get a blank piece of paper and draw away approach.

Back of Lily’s card

It’s certainly been an interesting Mother’s Day, I hope everyone’s staying safe and doing ok. Remember to do your social distancing and self isolating if you need to. Fingers crossed we all get through this.

Will the kids be going to school?

Will the kids be going to school?

It’s been a long and stressful week. Mostly around one Question. Will the kids be going to school or not? For some, that question was answered on Wednesday, and at least the situation was clear. We however were in the group of people, where things remained unclear and confusing.

Jack’s situation

Jack has an EHCP and attends a SEN school, which put him in the group that would still go to school. So that makes thing clear right? Wrong! Two days of mixed messages, uncertainty and confusion coming from all quarters. I thought he was staying in school, then I thought he was going to be staying home from today. Finally this afternoon the decision was made that he would stay going to school.

His whole class are staying in school, and we decided for the sake of his routine he will still go. He’s already shown signs that he’s worried about what’s going on. To pull him out of school now, would escalate that and not be good for him. So unless we need to self isolate, it’s business as usual.

Lily’s situation

It’s been just as complicated and stress with Lily. First I though, she finishes school on Friday and that’s it. Then because we have a disability social worker, we thought we were expected to send her to school. We tried to get clarification on this, and we had to wait for answers. Basically no one was really sure what we were meant to do.

The answer came back today. Lily is now off school, but we can send her into school if Jack is at home and struggling. For example, if his anxiety was causing him to be excessively violent, causing the home environment to be dangerous. With Jack at least for now still going to school, that’s not an issue.

How’s everyone finding the situation?

I know it’s not just us, and this is a stressful time for everyone. Will the kids be going to school? Has been the question on all parents minds this week. Lily’s school have sent some work home for her, but the question of how to keep her busy, entertained and still learning is the one that now weighs heavy. At least I know art will keep her happy. How is everyone else feeling? How are you going to keep your kids busy? Any ideas are most welcome. Drop them in the comments.

Is Lego Good for Autistic Children?

Is Lego Good for Autistic Children?

With Coronavirus taking grip of the country, we are staying at home and avoiding the madness. So I got to thinking, Is Lego good for autistic children? I’ve seen a lot of stuff around the subject online, they are even doing Lego based therapy. Where they get children working together, to encourage learning and interaction with others.

That’s not something we have ever tried, but Jack has an incredible love for Lego. I dread to think how much money we’ve spent on it over the years. To make matters worse, most of it is broken up in a big tub. He recently expressed a wish to be able to keep his Lego safe, and not get broken. Which was nice to hear. Oh how he is growing up.

Lily has Lego as well, but it has mostly been built by me. She enjoys seeing the finished product more than the building phase.

The positive points

There’s no intense research done here, it’s just my observations on Jack. And as Lily proves, it won’t be the same with all autistic children. But for Jack, Lego has had a hugely positive impact on his life. Here are the areas I’ve seen a positive impact

  • The building process having a calming effect
  • Learned to do something independently
  • something that keeps him off technology
  • Pride in achieving a finished product

Calming effect


Those are four very important points. Finding things that have a calming effect are so important to autistic people, especially as many also have issues with anxiety. We are forever searching for new calming strategies. Lego isn’t an option if a meltdown is well under way, but as a preemptive tactic to keep Jack calm it works well.

Acting independently

Doing something independently is a huge thing for Jack. It’s not that he doesn’t have the physical capabilities to do things on his own. But getting him to act independently is extremely hard for a variety of reasons. One of the main ones, is Jack needs constant reassurance that he is safe in his environment. In his bedroom he seems to feel more assured, and he’s learnt that is his space. But anywhere else, even other rooms in our house, he needs constant reassurance that he is ok and is safe. In order to be able to concentrate on a task.

With Lego he will sit and build by himself. He will ask for help with putting stickers on, and if pieces get stuck together. Other than that he will do it on his own. Sometimes he asks me to come and build something with him, but I believe that’s because he wants the company.

Keeping him off technology

Jack has some sort of technology going most of the time. It’s part of his way of dealing with his anxiety, coping with his environment and feeling in control. It’s not ideal, but he always needs to have at least some background noise. When outside, and depending on what we are doing his phone might go in his pocket. But that’s about it.

So there will always be something on in the background, whether that’s the TV, music or something playing on his phone like YouTube. But once he is building, his main focus is on the Lego. Jack loves to be outdoors, but when he’s inside it’s difficult to get him away from his Xbox or the TV. Lego is one of the best ways to do it.

Pride in his creations

We all take great pride in achieving something, your autistic children are no different. Autistic people often have difficulty showing emotions in a way that the “average” person understands, but they absolutely feel emotion. Regular readers will already know that Jack & Lily to great pride and excitement from showing off their works on here at Lily’s Art Gallery and Jack’s Documents.

He takes great pride in his Lego, which is why he now wants to make sure they are looked after. He’s still got plenty to build from Christmas and his birthday to keep him busy for a while. Here is what he currently has under his bed to keep them safe.

Answering the question

So to answer the original question. Is Lego good for Autistic children? I think the general answer is yes. Of course nothing is going to be right for everyone, but there’s plenty of evidence to say it’s a good thing. From our perspective it’s been a very good for Jack.

The popular Lego at the moment seems to be Hidden Side, you can find it here on amazon (affiliate link – if you happened to want to buy some Lego, I’d receive a small commission if you used this link) of course Lego is expensive, but there are cheaper alternatives out there that you can find in places likes Wilkinsons and Poundland, or on amazon – click here for another affiliate link.

Does anyone personally, or does their children use Lego a lot, and get as much out of it as Jack does? What other ways do you use as calming strategies? What other interests do people have that keeps them and their children engaged. There are so many ideas out there and I am always looking for new ones. Let me know in the comments below.

Don’t Mention The C Word

Don’t Mention The C Word

It’s a phrase that is used for many different things, but at the moment it can only mean one thing. Don’t mention the C word. Coronavirus. I’ve refrained from talking about it up to now, as I’ve felt no need to. But as the situation escalated here in the UK, today we had our first issue.

Lily has been complaining about pain in her ear. We rang up the doctor and were told they couldn’t see her, as they can’t offer face to face appointments. Instead we got a phone call from a doctor, who prescribed antibiotics despite not being sure what was wrong with her.

Yet Lily is still supposed to be going to school on Monday. It just seems like madness to me. Nowhere spreads a virus quite like a school. Maybe the situation will change by Monday, we will just have to wait and see.

Panic Buying

The panic buying that has been going on, has been a bit ridiculous. But you think about how mad people go at Christmas when the shops are shut for one day. We really shouldn’t be surprised. We went out to get some shopping done today, as it was payday. In three different stores, there’s was no paracetamol, hand sanitiser or hand wash to be seen. One store did have some toilet roll, which appears to be a miracle.

We are fortunate enough to have been able to go out today, and we have some support around us to help us out. That’s not the case for everybody. There are a lot of vulnerable people out there. I wish people had shown a bit more consideration, when buying enough toilet paper to last a year. And don’t even get me started on the fact it’s completely unnecessary for this virus. If diarrhoea was a symptom I’d understand it.

Looking forward

There’s a lot of uncertainty around at the moment, which of course is the last thing autistic people need. Jack especially concerns me. If the schools do get shut, how is he going to handle his routine being changed? The answer is probably badly, he’s already struggling at the moment, so the last thing we need is his routine disrupted. School holidays that we have time to prepare for are problematic enough.

This evening Lily has started to look really poorly. Hopefully it is just an ear infection, and the antibiotics will soon put things right. But the uncertainty caused by not being able to get her seen doesn’t help.

How’s everyone feeling about the Coronavirus? Do you feel prepared for it? Are you worried about how you would cope if there’s a “shutdown”? Or if you caught the virus? Or are you still feeling like it’s a case of, don’t mention the C word? I’d like to here your comments on the situation and how you’ve found things so far. I’m sure I will have plenty more to say over the coming days, weeks maybe even months. It’s going to be a difficult time for everyone, but for those who rely so heavily on routine, this could be the biggest challenge we’ve ever faced.

The easy life of carers

The easy life of carers

It’s been a very busy week involving school and health issues for the kids. I’m working on a post about school, but first I wanted to talk about something else. What some people perceive as the “easy life” of carers. I know some carers get very annoyed and angry at people who think like that. Personally I try to just laugh off their ill informed judgment.

Firstly, the paltry sums of money families living with disability are given, pales into insignificance compared to the cost to the country, if we all turned around and said we can’t do it anymore. The cost to the country would be astronomical and probably couldn’t be met.

Breaking point

I’ll be honest in saying we have been on the brink of breaking point, on more than one occasion with Jack. His sheer size and violent behaviours were the issues for us, but everyone has their own problems. None are “easier” than the other. The demands on parents/carers are massive, and greatly under appreciated by too many.

The care part, is only half the story though. Looking after your child or children is a full time job itself for many. The demand of the physical care is full on. Then with something like autism, the “invisible disabilities” where what the problems are aren’t clear. You have the time and effort to just work out what the problems your child is having. This can sometimes take months and even years of research, discussions, meetings and trial and error of strategies.

A week of appointments

I’m looking forward to tomorrow, as we don’t have any appointments for the first time this week. It’s been a full on week, and it’s left me feeling tired. These appointments, which like with everything vary in nature depending on the child and what their needs are. Are something that if you’ve not experienced it yourself, are difficult to comprehend. Which is why some people fail to realise what is involved with being a carer.

To give people an idea of just how full on things can be, I’ll go through the first four days of this week.

The week that was (Lily)

Monday – Doctors appointment for Lily. With the GP regarding her problems with anxiety, and to get a CAMHS referral. On the surface this looks the simplest task there is, but unlike Jack we are just starting out with Lily, and have feeling like we have no idea where we are or what to do. So the time and effort trying to think up strategies and solutions has been massive.

Tuesday – Lily’s parents evening. Two appointments required, one with her teacher and one with her SENCO. This wasn’t your average turn up and hear how they’ve been doing parents evening. It was arranged to also talk over Lily’s issues and needs at school, which have really escalated quite quickly over the last term.

Putting together a plan to get a EHCP was discussed. Unfortunately Lily’s infant school was terrible, and the head teacher didn’t believe Lily had autism. So no evidence of any needs for Lily were passed over to her junior school, which has been helpful (high levels of sarcasm here).

The school were very honest, and agreed with us that Lily needs an EHCP. That she is struggling in mainstream school, and will eventually need to move to a SEN school. The good news is she is progressing really well with her work. The school have been really good, and provided lots of support despite not having any funding for her. I can’t speak highly enough of them. I don’t think we could find a better mainstream school to go through this process with.

The week that was (Jack)

Wednesday -The focus changed to Jack. It was his Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) review. We had to go to Jacks school and the review was with the school Deputy Head, Jack’s teacher and a school psychologist. Including travel it took 5 hours.

If you are unaware of what a EHCP review is like I will give you a brief idea. Big sheets of paper stuck onto a wall with various headings. We all write onto the sheets, things that are working, things that are not working. Then what needs to be worked on going forward, and how we are going to do that. This type of thing is mentally tiring on any subject. But imagine that subject being the health and well being of your child, and you get it wrong it’s them who suffer. Can you imagine that pressure? I felt exhausted Wednesday evening.

Thursday – No time to rest. CAMHS came to do a health pre assessment on Jack. Basically ten questions on different aspects of your child’s health, where you have to decide whether they fit into the category of, no additional needs, Low, Moderate or High. With the exception of challenging behaviour, which has two added categories of severe and priority.

You have to evidence each one, for it to go forward to a review, where we put the case forward to get Jack some health care funding. Although not the only thing, the major area for Jack is challenging behaviour. In order to evidence Jacks needs, we need to keep a log of all Jack’s challenging behaviours. The last thing you want to do after dealing with Jack having a meltdown down, is have to go and write about it straight away. But whatever needs to be done, we will always do.

Final thoughts

Myself and Natalie are lucky that we have each other for support and help. I know people who are doing this on there own. Some have more than two kids they need to be carers for. As for this easy life of carers then. Carers should be treated as heroes, not frowned upon like they are in some quarters. We are saving the country money, we are not a burden, and far too often people are doing it with little to no support.

We are fortunate to be receiving good support, but that’s not always the case and more needs to be done to help carers and those they care for. As always I welcome any comments and if anyone wants to share their experiences? That would be great.

One final thing. During the CAMHS visit they said we should write a book as they are amazed with what we’ve done for Jack. We both laughed. They said they were serious, or do a blog or something. I told them about this blog, and they said that was great and asked permission to share this with professions and parents. It blew my mind. I was so incredibly flattered. It made feel the decision to do this was the right one, and that I am doing something that is truly worthwhile.

Click here to go to a Beautifully written piece by an unknown author, that’s fits this so well.

Autism At The Cinema

Autism At The Cinema


Lily had a great week at school. With all the problems we had before the half term holidays, she has done incredibly well. Friday night was treat Lily night. Jack was at overnight rest-bite, so it was a chance to focus on Lily, and test out autism at the cinema. It would be the first time Lily had been to the cinema in some time, and since her difficulties with autism had really started to show.

First off acouple of things have changed. She now takes in ear defenders, we picked up these ones for less than £5 on amazon. (Affiliate link) They are worth every penny. Jack has used them for years, and won’t go anywhere without having them with him.

We always thought Lily didn’t need them. We were wrong. She might not need them to the extent Jack does, as she appears more tolerable to noise. But it’s become clear she does need them to cope in busy situations, and just because she doesn’t “kick off” like Jack does. It doesn’t mean she’s not struggling.

She also went for an eye test, and now has glasses. We are hoping this will solve the issues she is having with headaches. She has been enjoying school again, which is great. The situation still needs keeping an eye on. I really don’t think going to a big secondary school is going to be good for Lily. But how we plan ahead for that I’m not sure. But for now at least she is happy again.

Lily wanted to go and see the new Sonic movie at the cinema. Jack had already seen it, so we chose to do it when he wasn’t going to be there. First she wanted McDonald’s.

Autism at the Cinema

After that it was off to the Odeon Cinema. Since I last went it had been kitted out with new comfy reclining seats. I was extremely comfortable for the movie, laid back with my drink and popcorn. 

Lily loved the reclining seat, we were set up on the back row in the corner. Though Lily is usually ok out in public, and she doesn’t “stim” to a very noticeable level, unless you are looking for it. We thought it the best place to sit, with her anxieties and behaviours having increased since the last cinema trip.

It was Friday evening and the cinema was pretty full, but Lily was absolutely fine. Due to the big comfy seating arrangement, you get a lot of space. So you don’t feel cramped or surrounded, which definitely helps. She really I enjoyed it, we all did to be fair. I was a young kid when Sonic first came onto the scene in the early 90s. So there was a bit of nostalgia there for me. 

Lily eyeing up the popcorn & sweets

There were a few times during the movie, that Lily looked over to me and just looked so happy. I can’t wait until we can go to the cinema again, maybe with Jack as well. Though he seems to always go to the cinema at rest-bite, and watch what I want to watch with him. I still haven’t watched Avengers End Game. Not that I’m bitter about it or anything….

Anyway it was a lovely evening for the 3 of us. There are autism friendly screenings at the Odeon cinema, and that’s great. But Lily doesn’t need them, not at the moment anyway. I also think Jack would be fine at that cinema. He is likely to get a bit more excitable than Lily, but when he’s watching something he likes, he tends to put full concentration into it. I think he’s be fine. We will look at testing out this theory soon