What’s it like being an autism Dad?

What’s it like being an autism Dad?

I mostly like to talk about Jack & Lily when it comes to autism, but today I’m going to talk about myself. I will be answering the question what’s it like being an autism Dad? It’s not a term I generally use for myself. Going around saying I’m an autism dad (or mum/mom) is not for me. But I wanted to open up a bit, and show you what it’s like to be a parent to two autistic children. I don’t want it to come across as having a moan about what’s difficult either. Sure I will have a look at the difficult things, but I have plenty of reason to be happy too.

Before I get started, these are my experiences with my autistic children. Every autistic person is different, the experiences we’ve had as a family wont be the same for everyone.

What’s it like being an autism dad?
photo of me worn out by the kids

Family and Sacrifices

First of all, we have been pretty lucky to have an understanding and supportive family around us. This is not always the case. I’ve heard some absolute horror stories, of people being completely abandoned by their family. Just because their child is autistic, and that doesn’t fit with how they want to be perceived.

This has not been the case for us, but there have still been challenges, and sacrifices made. We have missed lots of family outings. This is due to Jack’s anxiety, we are always invited, but whether Jack will go depends on the situation. Where is it? Who’s going? And how busy will it be? The last major one was my brothers wedding. We tried to prepare Jack for it, the day before the wedding he tried his suit on and said he was looking forward to it. Then on the day of the wedding, he just flat out refused to go.

Having to split the family

I ending up going with Lily, who gets a bit anxious in busy places, but settles if she’s with people she knows. Ideally I wanted Natalie and Jack to be there, I was disappointed they weren’t. But you can’t let these things get to you, it’s part of being an autism dad. We have to do what’s right for Jack. I rang later to see if he would come to the evening part, but he still said no.

Several birthdays and celebrations have been missed, or one of us have taken Lily. It’s nobodies fault, that’s just how it is. They’ve not all been missed, Jack has been out for family meals at restaurants etc.. Why can he do it sometimes, but not others? My best guess is it depends where his anxiety is? If he’s been having a difficult time at school etc, he will be less tolerant.

Jack & Lily
Jack & Lily our for a walk

Going out

Some families have real trouble ever doing anything, so again we don’t have it so bad. What you do need though is a thick skin, and if you’re like me and don’t have that, you need to develop it. Natalie has been around disability her whole life, so she was somewhat used to it. I wasn’t ready for it at all.

When we go out, even on Jack’s best days he will have some little moments. We will have people stare at us. It’s happened every time up until now, and it will happen every time in the future. If Jack has a full on meltdown, then we will have people gawking at us, and no doubt some will be judging.

To give you an idea of a meltdown in public. Imagine being stood outside the giraffe pen at the zoo, trying to calm down a 6ft tall 13 stone child. Who is just growling, whilst kicking, punching, head butting and scratching you. Whilst people stop to have a look, and then if Jack’s catches someone looking at him, he will go for them. So I have the added stress of stopping him hurting other people.

Learning and improving

After many years of learning we are more prepared for things like days out, which can mean preparing weeks in advance for a trip out. A spur of the moment day trip is not on the agenda. Jack needs to be prepared for it well in advance, whilst Lily tends to be okay, she too is more comfortable with this approach.

We get social stories and PECS ready so Jack is fully aware of what to expect. Then whilst we are out, we have to really watch Jack’s anxiety and sensory input. Where necessary we will apply deep pressure to keep him modulated. This might involve holding his hand, whilst we walk around and squeezing his hand repetitively. Or stopping to squeeze his arms and legs, jumping up and down together. Holding each other’s hands and pushing into each other, or waving your arms around like some sort of demented jellyfish. Sounds fun right?

Like I Said you need a thick skin, and it’s no good being shy, or worrying about what other people think. Days out are always stressful, but we do enjoy ourselves. I certainly have no intention of hiding away, especially when the kids want to go out and explore as much as they can.

Family
At a fireworks display

My own social life

Now I am going to talk about my own social life. To be honest I’ve barely had one, and that’s not completely down to the kids. I’ve had my own struggles with depression, and spent 10 years working full time. Then as soon as I’d come home Natalie would go to work, and I’d have the kids to look after. We basically had no money, so even if I felt like meeting up with friends, which wasn’t very often. I’d just wouldn’t be able too.

Due to circumstances, we’ve only ever really had my parents to call on as babysitters. Which we have done from time to time, and myself and Natalie have had opportunities to go out. I’ve never liked to ask too often though, as there have been stages where Jack has been a real handful. I’m in a better place now, and so is Jack so having a social life is a possibility, which again is more than some people have. Some have to do this all on their own.

Things to be proud of

Being an autism dad might mean you have to move the goalposts of what you hoped for your child, and that’s okay. Maybe you dreamed one day your son would play football for England, but it turns out them just being able to play with a group of other kids. Is something that can bring you just as much pride.

I have so many examples of these sort of things, that are simple everyday happenings for the average person. But mean the absolutely world to us. Things like Jack being able to walk into his school hall. Lily being able to walk into her classroom, with all her classmates. There are loads, but they can be for another post at another time.

Thank you for taking the time to read, and I just hope that it gives people a bit more awareness. Of what it’s like being an autism dad or mum, or autistic person.

Dad Does Autism

Dad Does Autism blog checking in

Dad Does Autism blog checking in

It’s been tough going so far this week. I’m trying not to let things get to me, but I’m finding it impossible not to worry. The Dad Does Autism blog is certainly helping me keep my sanity, but myself and Natalie both have underlying health conditions. Obviously there is concern for our own health, but the impact one of us being hospitalised on the kids would be huge.

Obviously it wouldn’t be easy on any children, but the difficulty in understanding and communicating, means Jack at 12 years old will find it as confusing as a much younger child. Unfortunately we’ve had some experience with this. A couple of years ago Natalie fell and hit her head, it quite quickly became apparent things weren’t right. So we called for an ambulance.

Seeing his mum taken away in ambulance convinced Jack she was going to die. I didn’t realise this at first, he became very quiet and withdrawn. I thought it was the shock of what happened, but Natalie came home later that day and we told him everything was OK. Over the next few days Jack didn’t get any better, and started lashing out. We managed to get him to communicate, that he still thought Mum was going to die. It took a few days using PECS and social stories, but eventually he was happy that mum was not going to die.

Talking about coronavirus

We have talked with the kids about the coronavirus a little bit, they knew the reason they were of school. So we told them there’s a chance we could get poorly, but most people get better. Lily doesn’t seem to phased by it, she doesn’t really understand what it means. Jack on the other hand, keeps getting worked up about it. He’s started saying it’s a zombie virus, and we will all be turned into Zombies.

I’m guessing someone’s said something in a YouTube video. The trouble with letting Jack do things on his own, if he sees a video like that, he will take it literally. The BBC news or people joking around on YouTube, Jack has no concept of the difference. So I’m currently trying to convince there’s not hoards of Zombies roaming the Derbyshire countryside.

Trying to cope

As I said, I’ve started to struggle mentally. So I’m now making a concerted effort to get back on track. Getting outside and doing the daily exercise had ground to a halt. So I’m back out there today, playing some sports with Lily. I’ve always liked to play sport, rather then just do what I call mundane exercise. I don’t mind a walk around somewhere nice, but jogging and going to the gym I’ve always hated.

Then there’s my autism blog, it’s certainly been more difficult to keep up the writing, with the kids always at home. I have managed to do a bit most days, but there needs to be a bit more general organisation. So we can all be a bit more productive. Getting the kids to go to bed, and to sleep is become more and more challenging. They just aren’t getting the stimulation during the day to wear them out. Especially Jack, who has been up into the early hours the last few days. We are trying, but being so limited with what you can do, it’s proving difficult.

Exciting things to come

There are a couple of things I am excited about. I have started writing my first short story, that I plan to share on here. It’s about halfway done. It will be the first time I’ve wrote a piece of fiction and shared it with people in over 12 years. It’s exciting and terrifying at the same time, but I’m so happy this autism blog has given me both the platform and the confidence to do it.

Natalie is also planning to write a piece for the website, which I am really pleased about. It will be about how the relationship between Jack and Lily was built, the strategies used etc.. Natalie really is the “expert” with this stuff, I spent a lot of time at work in the early years and Natalie did a phenomenal job with Jack and Lily. She doesn’t have much confidence with the writing side, so with my help with that side, she’s happy do it. As always teamwork is vital to our success. Hopefully that will be on its way soon.

Dad Does Autism

Anyone else starting to crack up?

Anyone else starting to crack up?

So it’s basically been 2 weeks of everyone being at home, and not being able to go out. So the question I want to ask is, anyone else starting to crack up? Or is it just me? I’ve got a lot of things I can be getting on with to pass the time, but for the last couple of days I’ve struggled for motivation.

What really hit home yesterday, was I saw it in Lily for the first time. She didn’t want to go outside, she didn’t want to do much of anything. She just sort of moped about, looking fed up. I was in a funny moody, Natalie and the kids would tell you I was being annoying. Basically I was making silly noises, and doing stupid things. It’s something I do quite a lot, I get a sort if release from it. Yesterday was over the top and I got on everyone’s nerves.

In the end we went for a little drive around locally. I’m not sure where you stand with just having a bit of a drive. We didn’t get out anywhere, we just had a bit of a drive. Is that ok? I’m not really sure, but I needed to see some different scenery for my sanity. Everyone else felt the same, and I personally felt much better when we got back. I think everyone did. Jack has started to get more and more agitated, by not being able to follow his normal routines. He’s become very argumentative, but we are just about keeping a lid on it. I just wish I had some answers for him, the uncertainty is the worst part for everybody. For Jack it is even more of a problem.

So is anyone else starting to crack up? Or are you doing ok so far? If you are starting to feel it, what are you doing to try and cope with it? Any ideas are welcome, please leave a comment below.

Dad Does Autism

Delayed processing as part of autism

Delayed processing as part of autism


So we are into the second week of the kids being at home. Since my last post things haven’t been going quite so well. Jack has delayed processing, understanding delayed processing as part of autism, and how it effects Jack, was something that took us a long time to get our heads around.

To put it in broad terms, an autistic person may experience a delayed response to sensory stimuli. What this means using Jack as an example. When I ask Jack a question, there is usually no response. It’s as if he hasn’t heard the question. I normally ask again, as Jack usually has a TV or some music on. Just in case he didn’t hear. But it is highly likely he did hear the first time.

Echolalia and learned responses

He just needs a lot more time to process what has been said, than you would typically expect from a child. Jack can give immediate responses, but these are what are called learned responses. Which is where his echolalia comes in. Jack can learn a conversation, and repeat it the next time the same situation comes up. But this is like someone on auto pilot. You are not getting his true thoughts and feelings. We have had many “disagreements” with “professionals” who have worked with Jack regarding this.

Getting Jack to express those true thoughts and feelings, hasn’t been an easy process. We are getting there slowly, and Jack is much better for it. Learning ourselves when to use social stories and PECS took time. They are so important and have been vital to Jack’s progress, and his ability to communicate.

Visual Aids - a picture exchange communication system folder
One of Jack’s PECS folders

As a parent it’s not easy to always remember this. Sometimes you can forget that a simple question like, what do you want for dinner? Is not so simple for an autistic child. Jack has to be given options to choose from, otherwise you just get a blank look and maybe a “don’t know”. Start with options of food he knows, even showing him the options, and he can give you an answer fairly quickly. Even in a situation of high anxiety or meltdown, though it’s likely he will respond with nods of the head rather than words.

Delayed response to situations

This delayed processing as part of autism, also comes into play, with situations that happen. Which is why it comes as no surprise to me, that Jack was fine with the sudden change last week. But this week he is finding it very difficult. His anxiety has gone through the roof, and he’s become tense and argumentative. It’s like it has taken him a week to process what is happening, and everything that has changed.

We are now prepared for this, and a week isn’t actually a long time. In the past Jack has had spikes of behaviours that stemmed from an incident that has happened months before. Which left us and everyone else baffled, until we finally worked it out with Jack. Knowing about the delayed processing, and just how long the delay can be has certainly been a great help. Now when Jack is unhappy, we know to trace back for months to find the solution if necessary.

What’s happening now?

Jack finding things difficult this week, in one sense can be a good thing. It’s only taken a week for him to start to process what’s going on. So we can now work on bringing his anxiety down, and getting him in a happy place. 

The one issue with that of course is these are unprecedented times. We don’t have the answers to the questions he wants answering. When can he go back to school? I don’t know. Will respite be back soon? I have no idea. When can we go and see his grandparents and their dog Mack? I don’t have clue. Just like I have no answers for him when he asks about going bowling, or to the cinema.

He is getting frustrated that I don’t have any answers for him, and he’s becoming very argumentative at times. To be honest I’m getting frustrated myself, the last two days have been hard work. There’s no break from it either, no chance to recharge. The outlook isn’t looking good for that break coming any time soon either.

Jack was fairly calm and relaxed Tuesday evening, so hopefully that’s a good sign. When his anxiety has been down he’s been really good. He’s been playing with Lily more than usual, and spending more time out of his room than usual. I guess being at home all the time, staying in your room all day gets a bit dull. One positive of this coronavirus stuff, is we are doing activities together more than we would usually, which is nice. 

Free sensory guide

Lastly I would like to point you in the direction of autismspectrumteacher.com where you can currently get a free 12 page guide to “Meeting Sensory Needs” by clicking here.

It is aimed at teachers in the school environment, but having read it there is certainly value in it for parents as well. As we know only to well with Jack, and are beginning to learn with Lily. Meeting a child’s sensory needs is so important. Get that right, and everything else will start to fall into place.

There’s some great information and ideas in the guide, which is the first chapter of an upcoming book. Though it’s based in the classroom, you shouldn’t assume your child’s school is always aware and doing these things. So arm yourself with information to take to them, that’s what we have always done and will continue to do for Jack and Lily.

The first week at home with the kids

The first week at home with the kids

So how is everyone feeling after the first week at home with the kids? I know some might have had them home earlier, and some homeschool all the time. But I think for most of us, at least in England where I live, this was week 1. So how’s it been?

Still having problems with Lily’s ear

It’s gone fairly well for us. The only real problem we’ve had is Lily is still complaining of pain in her ear. She seems fine the majority of the day, but come night time it’s a different story. She has woken up crying every night this week. Jack has coped with it really well, a few times he seems to have slept hrough it. 

One time I went to check on Jack he was awake playing on his Nintendo Switch. It was around 4am. I asked him if Lily woke him up, he nodded yes. I asked him if he was alright, he nodded yes again. He was clearly tense, but he was managing to hold it together, which is really good.

Last night didn’t go so well. Lily woke up crying again, and this time I could hear straight away, Jack throwing things around his room. I went to check him and he had a real look of distress on his face and tears in his eyes. I tried to reassure him, but he just threw things at me, I told him Lily was ok, and left him for a few minutes. When I checked he had calmed down enough to be sat on his bed. It was just one disturbed nights sleep to far.

It’s a frustrating time, due to the situation getting a doctors appointment is near impossible, so you speak to one on the phone and they are guessing what’s wrong. She’s on her second antibiotic now. Fingers crossed this one works. The situation is difficult enough, without that added stress.

Things have generally been good

The day times have generally been good, during the first week at home with the kids. Jack and Lily both seem to be enjoying being at home. They’ve had some fun doing different activities. Jack has been a bit argumentative, which was to be expected, but has been calmer than he was during the recent school holidays. We’ve not pushed him with doing school work. He’s never had any homework, so he’s not understanding why he suddenly has to do work at home. So I’ve got a few ideas for him to learn using things he’s interested in.

Lily didn’t do any work the first few days, I thought it right to give her some time to adjust to what was going on. Then she started doing the work by herself. I’ve seen people trying to be teachers, and it’s almost like a competition with some people on social media. I don’t understand that way of thinking myself. I’m more interested in my children’s well being, than I am making sure they get all the work sheets done.

We are lucky to have a decent bit of garden space, so the kids can get out there for a bit of fresh air and some exercise. They’ve been out everyday, with the exception that Jack didn’t want to go outside yesterday. 

I’m doing ok

I’m holding up alright. I am concerned about the effect of a prolonged lockdown on my depression, but I’m doing fine. I’ve actually enjoyed having the kids home for the most part. Ask me if I still am in 3 or 4 weeks, then maybe my answer will be different, but so far I’m feeling good. I’ve been spending a lot of time at home anyway over the past year, so one week without going out doesn’t bother me. If it becomes 4, 5, 6 weeks, then it will be a different story.

The first week at home with the kids then, up to now it’s been pretty good, everyone’s fit and well, and as long as that’s the case I don’t want to complain about anything else. I hope it’s going as well for everyone else. Families living with autism have extra pressures, and this a really difficult time. But it is difficult for all families. So I say to everybody, stay safe and stay well.

Don’t Mention The C Word

Don’t Mention The C Word

It’s a phrase that is used for many different things, but at the moment it can only mean one thing. Don’t mention the C word. Coronavirus. I’ve refrained from talking about it up to now, as I’ve felt no need to. But as the situation escalated here in the UK, today we had our first issue.

Lily has been complaining about pain in her ear. We rang up the doctor and were told they couldn’t see her, as they can’t offer face to face appointments. Instead we got a phone call from a doctor, who prescribed antibiotics despite not being sure what was wrong with her.

Yet Lily is still supposed to be going to school on Monday. It just seems like madness to me. Nowhere spreads a virus quite like a school. Maybe the situation will change by Monday, we will just have to wait and see.

Panic Buying

The panic buying that has been going on, has been a bit ridiculous. But you think about how mad people go at Christmas when the shops are shut for one day. We really shouldn’t be surprised. We went out to get some shopping done today, as it was payday. In three different stores, there’s was no paracetamol, hand sanitiser or hand wash to be seen. One store did have some toilet roll, which appears to be a miracle.

We are fortunate enough to have been able to go out today, and we have some support around us to help us out. That’s not the case for everybody. There are a lot of vulnerable people out there. I wish people had shown a bit more consideration, when buying enough toilet paper to last a year. And don’t even get me started on the fact it’s completely unnecessary for this virus. If diarrhoea was a symptom I’d understand it.

Looking forward

There’s a lot of uncertainty around at the moment, which of course is the last thing autistic people need. Jack especially concerns me. If the schools do get shut, how is he going to handle his routine being changed? The answer is probably badly, he’s already struggling at the moment, so the last thing we need is his routine disrupted. School holidays that we have time to prepare for are problematic enough.

This evening Lily has started to look really poorly. Hopefully it is just an ear infection, and the antibiotics will soon put things right. But the uncertainty caused by not being able to get her seen doesn’t help.

How’s everyone feeling about the Coronavirus? Do you feel prepared for it? Are you worried about how you would cope if there’s a “shutdown”? Or if you caught the virus? Or are you still feeling like it’s a case of, don’t mention the C word? I’d like to here your comments on the situation and how you’ve found things so far. I’m sure I will have plenty more to say over the coming days, weeks maybe even months. It’s going to be a difficult time for everyone, but for those who rely so heavily on routine, this could be the biggest challenge we’ve ever faced.

Carers don’t have time to be ill

Carers don’t have time to be ill

I woke up today feeling absolutely terrible, and carers don’t have time to be ill. Pretty sure it’s just a cold, and I haven’t been struck down with the dreaded Coronavirus. But I feel terrible anyway. My temperature is really high and I just want to sleep. Not much time for that though.

Still have to get the kids ready for school. Lily still needs walking to school, and then back again. I will admit to spending most of the time the kids were at school, curled up feeling sorry for myself.

Jack came home in one of his agitated moods. This quite often happens with the long drive home he has. The way we deal with this is going for a walk around our village. Jack goes on PokemonGo, and by the time we get back he has usually settled down.

I really didn’t have the energy for it today, but not doing it would prove to be harder. As Jack wouldn’t settle without going. Of course today he didn’t want to come into the house when we got back. It took a lot of effort to finally get him inside. I made him a sandwich and he finally settled down. Now I’m off to curl up and feel sorry for myself. At least until I am next wanted for something. Which probably won’t be long. Carers don’t have time to be ill.

Dad Does Autism

a nice quiet day

a nice quiet day


After the last few days, today we needed a nice quiet day. Natalie has to take her car to the garage. So with the kids at school. I had a good few hours to myself. I spent some time working on the website. And then did some much needed housework.

The house is packed full of god knows what. So I am trying to go through it and de clutter, and organise it better. It’s proving a slow process. Especially as Lily won’t let you get rid of anything. She even wants to keep empty sweet wrappers. Usually if you remove smaller things without her noticing. She doesn’t realise. But with her toys. It is more difficult, and starting to become a major concern. If anyone has any experience dealing with this. Then some advice would be most welcome.

The kids both came home from school happy, and wanted to play in the garden. So it was more of the Cricket/baseball game for me and Lily. Whilst Jack was pretending to be some sort of ninja. It was cold so we didn’t stay out too long.

I do try and get Jack to join in the sports games at times. But if you ask every time. He starts to get annoyed. I just like to remind him he can join in with us if he wants too.

Jack spent the rest of the evening in his room. Whilst Lily watched TV downstairs. All was calm and today was a nice quiet day. These can be rare, so you always have to enjoy them.

Dad Does Autism

The School Situation

The School Situation


Lily came home from school yesterday visibly upset. The school situation has been weighing on our minds for some time. Main stream school might not be right for Lily.

She is a couple of years behind with her learning. The real struggle however is the “social” aspect of school. She has a very close friend (or boyfriend ass she would say) and another friend. Outside of those two she has always found it difficult to mix with the other children.

In some ways the school have been good on helping Lily. There are times where she goes into smaller groups. She enjoys these sessions. Outside of that, Lily is complaining the school is to busy. Having been in the classroom a few times. It is clear she is finding the environment overwhelming, the school situation is great source of stress at the moment.

Yesterday there was an incident with some other children. It’s not clear exactly what happened. Lily finds it difficult to express her feelings and to explain herself. This could be what led to the problem at school. 

This just adds more weight to the thought that the school isn’t right. After the battles we’ve been through to get Jack to the school he is now at. We know the difficult road that lies ahead. With the added fact that Lily is not as obviously severe as Jack.

It was a difficult evening for Jack. He was upset about Lily. Whilst still on edge about his broken phone. He came downstairs at 10pm demanding to go Pokemon hunting. It took about 30 minutes to get him back to bed. With the help of the “snuggly’s who I will introduce the snuggly’s in a separate post. They are very important to Jack, and deserve their own post.

Dad Does Autism

Welcome the Dad Does Autism

Welcome the Dad Does Autism

Welcome to Dad Does Autism, the first post on my blog. I’m starting with just a little insight into a day in the life of our family, just to get the ball rolling, and so you can get to know us a little. After a troublesome morning Jack came home from school in a good mood. Natalie had picked Lily straight up from school and taken her to a swimming lesson. So Jack has some time with just Dad. He wanted to go “Pokemon hunting”, meaning go for a walk and play PokemonGo. Jack is Pokemon obsessed, whether it be PokemonGo, the games on the Xbox or Nintendo Switch, or the toys and cards. Jack uses one of my old phones without a SIM card. Just for playing games and watching YouTube.

Jack has an hour drive home from school and tends to have a lot of pent up energy when he arrives home. Meaning he often needs to let off some steam when he gets home. If I’m home by myself and Lily doesn’t want to go outside it’s not always easy, but this was a perfect chance to have a walk and try and have a talk with Jack. Talking to Jack is not easy, he tends to talk at you, rather than talk to you. The conversation topic is 95% of the time his choosing, and if you try and switch the topic he tends to just carry on talking about what he wants to anyway.

Out for a walk

We had a short walk around our village. Probably 30-40 minutes. Apart from when he was losing a Pokemon battle which he got angry about, it was nice and calm. I did manage to get him to talk about taking his Nintendo Switch to school, and he agreed it should stay at home. Which was really good. Fingers crossed he sticks to that, at least for a whie.

We got 50 yards from home…when catastrophe struck. Jack suddenly lost grip of his phone and it dropped to the floor. Jacks dexterity isn’t very good, and this wasn’t the first time this phone has been dropped. But it was the one that completely broke the screen. Though he was visibly upset and angry, he didn’t react as badly as I first feared and he walked back to the house.

He got more irritated when we were back in the house. A few years ago our CAMHS worker, suggested letting Jack keep his phone at all times as a way of managing his anxiety, which was through the roof all of the time. It kind of worked, but probably wasn’t the best idea in hindsight. He is completely dependant on it now, and if he can’t have his phone for any reason, it causes problems.

Thankfully Lily came home from swimming and said he could use the phone she occasionally uses at home, so he won’t get bored in the taxi ride to school. Jack was happy with this and completely calmed down. It was a really proud moment to end the day. A mobile phone catastrophe wasn’t how I had planned on starting this, but when you live with autism things often don’t go to plan. You have to adjust as you go along, so in one way its quite apt.

I fully believe in bringing up Jack and Lily with positivity, giving them every chance to everything that they want to do. It won’t always be easy, there will be times when things become difficult. But I want the best for my kids, and autism isn’t a reason to hide away and give up on things. That was our welcome to Dad Does Autism. I hope you enjoy, and find useful the content we all bring to you.

Dad Does Autism